Stellaria -

Stellaria - "Where Light meets the Ordinary"

About this blog

So, this is the place on the web where I will give an account of my daily life. Will it be interesting? I don't know. But at least I know I will post the things which interest me.

Southern France in B&W

photographyPosted by Rense Nov 07, 2009 18:19:12
Last summer, we've been to Southern France, the DrĂ´me. Today, I decided to do some B&W conversions on some of the landscapes I shot there. I am intrigued by the photos of Ansel Adams - which photog isn't? - and I tried to copy his style.


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Some Industar-50 photos

photographyPosted by Rense Nov 02, 2009 14:09:39
In my last post, I showed you how to clean an Industar-50 50mm/F3.5. In this post I'll show you some results with this lens. Nothing special, nothing official, but just real-life photos...


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One of the issues with this lens that is addressed more than once is its sensitivity to flare. The two next photos show how this can be resolved by using some kind of lens hood. Both are made from the same position, with a light at about 40 cm distance left above the can. In the first one, the lens is not protected from direct light. In the second one I used my hand to prevent light shining in the lens directly.

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Cleaning the Industar-50

photographyPosted by Rense Oct 30, 2009 16:03:09
One of the great things of Pentax is the possibility to use legacy glass. After the introduction of the crippled K-mount they never changed lens mounts, so there are literally millions of lenses available, often for not more than several tens of bucks. Before the K-mount was introduced, Pentax used the M42-mount, and the lenses with this mount can still be used, even on modern dSLR's, with a cheap adapter.

Many old lenses however share a common problem, a stiff focussing ring, caused by old lubricant. Notorious for this are the old Soviet lenses, and I have a M39 Industar-50 which had precisely this problem. So I decided to take it down in order to clean it. Here are some photos to show the process. I hope this will be helpfull!

The lens
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In the upper scale ring there are three tiny screws. In the photo you see one just above the 0,65 sign. Unscrew them, but be careful: these screws are really tiny and they tend to jump everywhere, even when you think they're still in the scale ring!


The lens with the removed scale ring
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Shown is the lens in nearby focus, with three pals that prevent the lens from focussing beyond infinity and too close. Clearly visible is the old, yellow lubricant. Although it is not really necessary, I chose to remove also the lower scale ring. This is done exactly the same way as you removed the upper scale ring.


The second ring removed
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To clean the helicoid completely, you have to unscrew it from the base of the lens. In order to do so, you have to remove the lower pal. You can reach this one when you get the lens in the position as shown below.


In this position you can remove the lower pal
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Tip for re-assembling the lens: when the pal is in the centre of the notch in the above ring, the "8" of the lower scale ring is exactly in line with this pal.

When you have unscrewed the pal, you can remove the base of the lens and clean the helicoid and the base. For relubrication use a good lithium lubricant. You can buy it in bike shops etc.


Ready to be cleaned
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A gallery make-over

photographyPosted by Rense Oct 26, 2009 16:40:01
Today, I started testing some new drafts for my web galleries. Until now, I just made use of the format that was provided by my web host, but I didn't like it at all. So, now I am trying some of the formats that are included in LightRoom, the Adobe program I am using for the management of my photos.





I started with a set of photos from the Vliehors, made this summer during the vegetation mapping of this military area on a sand flat in the Wadden Sea. It's one of the most deserted areas in our densely populated country. After the cavalry left the area in the 90-s, vegetation started to develop. Most probably this is not only an effect of the cessation of the area, but also of the growth of the sand flat at its Western edge.





To cut things short: if you like the photos posted here, and want to see more, and in a better quality, you can visit the new gallery. It's to be approached through the link on my web-page (see the info on the right), or by clicking this link.

Hope you like it!



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S-M-C Takumar 55mm/F1.8

photographyPosted by Rense Oct 25, 2009 22:50:24
It's one of those old cheapies you can find everywhere on the internet, the Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 55mm/F1.8. It once was the standard lens on the legendary Pentax Spotmatic, the first 35mm camera with TTL metering. Revolutionary!

These lenses go for about 25 euro's (about 35-40 USD), but the performance of this little baby goes far beyond that price! They can be mounted on a modern Pentax dSLR through an adapter, and the same holds for at least Canon cameras. This combo gives you a very cheap classic short tele-solution perfectly well suited for portraits. But the lens can do much more! With some fellow Pentax enthusiasts, we decided to shoot one week with the different variants of this lens, and share the photos in a Dutch Pentax forum.

Rather than posting a technical pixel-peepers test of the performance of the S-M-C Tak 55/1.8, I will post some real-life examples of what this beauty can do. For more examples of better quality you'd better visit the mentioned thread at Pentaxian.nl!








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